Independents Separatists and Allies

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Saluting soldier at the Veterans Park at the Bridge, Napoleon, Ohio

July 4th marks the annual celebration in America of its Independence Day, the result of the Declaration of Independence signed in 1776. America broke away from Britain’s control of her, yet in World War II, it was Britain to whose aid America eventually rose, and together they helped form the Allied forces that defeated the invasions of Japan and Hitler’s Nazi Germany.

It should be noted that the American Constitution, written to ensure the lasting freedom of its people, wisely called for separation of church and state. This insured the liberty of the people to chose their own religious callings, something that had been impossible in their former lives in Britain at that time.

Paradoxically, it was the Bible that was “…the most cited book in the political discourse of the age, referenced more frequently than the great political theorists…” scholar Martin E. Marty pointed out.

It’s time for Americans to think deeply about the preceding three paragraphs. No better time than July 4th!

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Credit:
Photo from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg

Tweets and Free Press Bashing

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Seems to me it’s about time for all Trump supporters to reassess their presidential choice.

President Trump’s campaign promises — which anyone with a slight bit of intelligence should have known couldn’t be kept — his abusive deliveries to women, and his constant bashing of our Free American Press are all the contrivances of someone who wants to preside by heavy-handed control. In many other countries, those types of individuals are called dictators.

This is not the way our American government works. And a Free Press has been essential to Democracy since this form of government began.

While the world is crashing, the President tweets and tweets, complains about and tries to disclaim the integrity of persons of the press, and generally reveals that he has no intention of being presidential. His tweets, especially, are diversion tactics to steer the American people to divisiveness and cover up the truth — that he doesn’t have the least idea what it takes to be an American President.

More at:
http://www.randomcomplaintdept.wordpress.com

Please weigh in with your comments. I know I’m not alone.

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Credit:
Photo from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg (former member of a local Press)

 

Thumb Jockeys Gaining on American Rule

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Did you ever stop to think about how many hundreds and thousands of letters — yea, those written-on-paper-with-ink sheets that many years ago were used as the world’s chief source of person-to-person communication — passed between people like President John Adams and…say, his cabinet and military leaders?

Of course, you haven’t!

Before the telephone, before the telegraph, before TV, people actually had desks at which they wrote letters of communication to each other. Letters were like interpersonal newspapers.

Now, the thumb jockeys will soon rule society. Their homogenized and coded messages to their audiences already zip through the air in milliseconds.

But, while in the past we had a written record of messages, we now have nothing of the sort. And if we do, those messages are easily erased, so nobody knows anything, and no one can be held accountable.

Is technology amazing, or what?

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Credit:
Photo courtesy of http://www.pixabay.com

 

Losing History

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What was the importance of the book titled, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”?

Who is Rocky Balboa?

What race horse ran the fastest Belmont Stakes?

The unflappable Teddy Roosevelt charged up ___ ____ Hill for what purpose?

Who wrote “The Sun Also Rises”?

Few members of the Great Generation remain, but if you are a Baby Boomer (1945-1965), you may be able to answer the above queries. And if you are a BB, how many of these questions can your children answer?

Are we relinquishing our own human history to the new world’s accomplished thumb jockeys, born of technology and tempered by tweets?

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Credit:
Photo from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg

 

 

 

Seventy-Five Years Old…

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This year, 2016, brings a birthday celebration to Mount Rushmore National Memorial in the state of South Dakota, USA. The monument is 75-years-old.

The biggest sculpture project in the lives of Gutzon and (son) Lincoln Borglum, the memorial consists of the faces of four American Presidents carved into the native rock of South Dakota’s Black Hills.

Finished in its last several years by Lincoln Borglum after the early death of his father, the memorial’s construction employed 400 plus men and took nearly 14 years to complete. The project  was twice stopped, refunded by interested and generous collaborators, and was the most consuming obsession of Gutzon Borglum, who began its work with huge vision, but very little financial support.

Borglum’s genius applied to the mammoth project allowed for an inch of rock erosion every 10,000 years. And with a draw of over three million visitors annually, the rock solid Presidents — George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Teddy Roosevelt, Abraham Lincoln — should be around for a long time to come.

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Credit:
Photo courtesy of http://www.pixabay.com

 

Binding Up Wounds

As early as May of 1856, at Bloomington, Illinois, before he was elected President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln observed in a speech that “A house divided against itself cannot stand”.

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With protestors steadily in the streets since Donald J. Trump became America’s President-elect, chaos has strengthened itself.

Lincoln was a great moral Presidential leader; he cared about this nation’s people and its growth. When the issues of slavery and secession divided the United States, his Second Inaugural speech contained this partial paragraph:

“With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation’s wounds…”

Let us wait no longer to begin that journey together…

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Credit:
Photo courtesy of http://www.pixabay.com

Iron Mistress

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The Alamo

Frontiersman and explorer Jim Bowie died at the battle of The Alamo in San Antonio, Texas, in 1836.

Bowie created a model in wood of a special weapon, a knife, which he later had forged into metal reality by an iron and steel metal-working expert named James Black, of Washington, Arkansas. Bowie, of course, became famous for his use of this most fierce knife which became known as the Bowie knife.

Maria Ursula de Veramendi, the woman Bowie married in April of 1833, asked him in their last conversation together if he thought someone could envy an object. She said she felt the Bowie knife, which lay beside Bowie when she could not, when he so often ventured far and wide, was her rival — “an iron mistress”.

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Credit:
Photo courtesy of http://www.pixabay.com