Scrabbled

If you enjoy the board game Scrabble, you might find my Scrabbled Short Story challenge interesting.

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At my Fans and Gamers blog, challenge yourself to unscrabble several words presented on a Scrabble board.

Interpret the words as they stand into a short short story.

The challenge is good (and entertaining) practice in cutting down your stories to the bare bones of showing, rather than telling.

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Credit:
Photo from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg

http://www.amazon.com/author/bahelberg3-sp-a_17

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A Fourth Place Tie in Short Story Writing

I’m pleased to announce my short story Normal Things received a Fourth Place three-way tie award in Amazon best-selling author Dan Alatorre’s March 2018 “Word Weaver Writing Contest”!

Dan’s scanned award proclamation follows:

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Normal Things will be featured during the last week of April at Dan’s blog. In the meantime, hop over to his place and enjoy reading the No. 1 awarded story, What If, and some of the other winners, day by day.

Great writers, here at WordPress, and great stories to share!

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My Amazon Author Page is:
http://amazon.com/author/bahelberg3-sp-a_17
 

Listening Closely to Destruct or Contruct…

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(Photo: A Female Cardinal listens positively for the next click of my camera, perhaps expecting a mate to appear.)

What do we expect to hear, or ascertain, when we listen closely at the workplace?

Is it gossip we seek, or some piece of constructive advice? Do we listen with positivity, or negativity? Is it some band wagon we want to jump on just to be part of the crowd that drives us to listen to whatever topic is being discussed?

Statistics show that co-workers everywhere may have to spend as much as 33% of their time listening to other employees complain about each other.

After collaborating these past two months with many other writers to help produce a scary anthology edited by Dan Alatorre and released at Amazon.com, I spent 0% of my time listening to discord. Even if a writer wasn’t particularly fond of one of the included stories, his focus remained on getting the whole into print, for the benefit of all.

It was a very positive, collective effort that produced “The Box Under the Bed”.

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Credit:
Photo from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg

Our Scary Anthology

 

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It is a rewarding experience to meet new writers and find people in every corner of the world, via the Internet, who share the joy of writing!

Because of this wonderful networking capability, our scary anthology titled “The Box Under the Bed”, edited by the prolific talents of Dan Alatorre —

http://www.danalatorre.com/2017/09/02/34540/

https://www.danalatorre.com/2017/09/18/check-this-out/

— has gotten notice from Ellen Datlow. Ellen is the recipient of numerous Horror Fiction awards, including the Life Achievement Award by the Horror Writers Association in 2011 !

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Credit:
Photo from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg

It Will Not Be Long

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It won’t be long, now, before author Dan Alatorre’s anthology titled “The Box Under the Bed” makes its debut on Amazon. Dan is a prolific WordPress blogger and one of Amazon’s bestselling authors to boot.

You can see more of his work and get more information about the upcoming anthology at:

http://www.danalatorre.com/2017-09-01/cover-reveal-the-scary-anthology

The anthology, which Dan edited, will feature scary stories from 20, or more, authors, including yours truly, and many of whom are also otherwise published.

It’s scary… !!

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Photo from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg

 

Poetry for The Ages — Robert Burns

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My Mom loved poetry and often tried her hand at some private lines. Robert Burns (1759-1796) was her favorite poet. For some unknown reason, I ended up moving to Vermont and marrying a guy I met there. His name was Burns. Hmmm…

Life is a never-ending trip!

One day recently, I picked up my Mom’s old keepsake poetry book entitled Burn’s Poems and discovered two things. Yes, his name was Burns, so that apostrophe (No. 1) on the title of his book of poems is misplaced ! It should read Burns’ Poems, or Burns’s Poems. That publisher’s (circa 1800s) mistake astounds me; but so does life!

Life is a trip you don’t pack a bag for; you just go with the flow. Best laid plans go asunder…normally.

In the picture (ABOVE), my Mom poses during a camping trip on a picnic bench for Dad, who, yes, inserted the rock under the leg to make it the same length as the others and steady the table! My Dad was our family’s Steady Eddie — always!

In Burns’ book, his poem “My Wife’s A Winsome Wee Thing” was marked by a worn, broken red length of ribbon. The poem says in part:

“She is a winsome wee thing,
She is a handsome wee thing,
She is a bonny wee thing,
This sweet wee wife o’ mine…

…The warld’s (world’s) wrack, we share…

Wi’ her I’ll blithely bear it,
And think my lot divine.”

My Mother’s name was Bonita Jean — Bonny. Life’s a wondrous mystery!

My Dad loved my Mom dearly, and that poem’s thoughts were my Dad’s for my Mom, thus (No. 2) the page remained marked by the little red ribbon throughout my Mother’s life. My Father’s name was Robert.

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Life is never a certainly. It only sends us messages to interpret.

Although my first writing love is Fiction prose, I’ve tried my hand at poetry now and again, too, as my Mother’s daughter at:
http://www.barbwritespoetry.wordpress.com

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Credit:
Family Photos from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg

 

 

 

Challenging Thoughts

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Most people, like this hungry-challenged kitty-cat, enjoy a challenge in life, and it may be that the more one answers that call to challenge, the more satisfying life becomes.

I enjoyed this writing- and work-related challenge given by one of the producer-writers of the movie “Bright Star”, a biographical drama on the life of poet John Keats. Paraphrased, she indicated that “playing with the (your) work is how you find your energy” for it, to carry it out well and with enthusiasm.

Keats, although unappreciated in his short life-time (dying at the age of just 25), practiced play with his work, and he practiced his poetry, as well as using it in his love letters to “Fanny”. His work eventually became recognized throughout the world as genius.

Work, play, practice altogether brings rewards.

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Credit:
Photo from the personal and copyrighted collection of Barbara Anne Helberg